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David Fielding

David FieldingMA, DPhil (Oxon)

David's research interests are mainly in the areas of development macroeconomics and quantitative political economy. Current interests include the economics of violent conflict in the Middle East, monetary unions in Sub-Saharan Africa, and the volatility of aid to developing countries. He has previously worked at the Universities of Oxford, Nottingham and Leicester (UK), Princeton University (US) and the United Nations University in Helsinki. His teaching at Otago includes macroeconomics and development economics.

 

Contact Details

Office CO719
Tel 64 3 479 8653
Email david.fielding@otago.ac.nz

 

Current Teaching

 

Selected Publications

"Evidence on the Functional Relationship between Relative Price Variability and Inflation with Implications for Monetary Policy," Economica (forthcoming, with P. Mizen)

"Fiscal and Monetary Policies in Developing Countries", in S. Durlauf and L. Blume (eds.) The New Palgrave Dictionary of Economics (second edition, forthcoming), London: Macmillan Press

"The Volatility of Aid," Economica (forthcoming, with G. Mavrotas)

"Myopic Loss Aversion, Disappointment Aversion, and the Equity Premium Puzzle," Journal of Economic Behavior and Organisation (forthcoming, with L. Stracca)

"The Impact of Monetary Union on Macroeconomic Integration: Evidence from West Africa," Economica vol. 72, 2005, pp. 683-704 (with K. Shields)

"How Does Political Instability Affect Investment Location Decisions? Evidence from Israel," Journal of Peace Research vol. 41, 2004, pp. 465-84

"Counting the Costs of the Intifada: Consumption, Saving and Political Instability in Israel," Public Choice vol. 116, 2003, pp. 297-312

"Modelling Political Instability and Economic Performance: Israeli Investment During the Intifada," Economica vol. 70, 2003, pp. 159-86

"Investment, Employment and Political Conflict in Northern Ireland," Oxford Economic Papers vol. 55, 2003, pp. 511-35

 

Website

David's personal website is also available.